Why Is My Peperomia Plant Dying? Tips for Rescuing Your Dying Peperomia Plant

If you’ve fallen in love with a peperomia plant, then you’re likely devastated if you think it’s dying. The good news is these lovely pieces of greenery are really hard to kill, even if you think they’re on their last legs.

So, let’s bring yours back to life.

A Peperomia Plant Is a Great Choice for Your Home or Office

A Peperomia Plant Is a Great Choice for Your Home or Office

With a dozen different types of plants that come from the peperomia family, you have so much to work with if you’ve decided this is the foliage for you. With leaves that come in red, green, gray, or purple, variegated, solid, or marble, and heart or circular shapes, this plant offers a wide range of opportunities to fall in love.

It will grow up to 12 inches tall and 12 inches wide, especially if you prune if back to allow it to become full and bushy.

The peperomia is also a wonderful air cleaner, absorbing common household toxins and breathing out oxygen at night, so consider keeping this one in your bedroom for fresh air while you sleep.

Finally, this succulent-adjacent plant offers incredible feng shui energy, specifically luck for anyone who spends any time around it.

Signs of a Dying Peperomia Plant

The most obvious signs of a dying peperomia plant are as follows:

  • Mushy stems
  • Discolored leaves
  • Dropping leaves
  • Scorched leaves
  • Soggy soil
  • Wrinkly leaves

Common Causes of a Dying Peperomia Plant

The most common causes of a dying peperomia plant include:

  • Too much direct sunlight
  • Too much water
  • Not enough light
  • Not enough water
  • Pests

Watering Needs of a Peperomia Plant

The peperomia plant calls for regular watering only once the soil dries out completely.

To read more about watering your plant, take a look at this article on watering mistakes that might be killing your plant.

Am I Underwatering My Peperomia Plant?

You can tell this foliage is being underwatered when the soil gets tightly packed, the leaves get brown or wrinkly, or the color gets less vibrant.

Restoring Water to Your Underwatered Peperomia Plant

If you do notice this plant has been underwatered, take the time to get onto a regular watering schedule.

Get used to sticking your finger into the soil about once a week. If you notice the soil is dry, you can water the plant until the water runs through the bottom of the pot. If, instead, the soil feels moist, leave the plant for now.

Am I Overwatering My Peperomia Plant?

You can tell you’re overwatering the peperomia plant by the soggy soil, mushy leaves, and mushy stems.

Restoring Balance to Your Overwatered Peperomia Plant

If you do notice the plant has been overwatered, you will need to get it into an area with more free-flowing air and more sunlight. Consider moving it into brighter, more indirect sunlight so the soil can dry out.

Further, if the soil is getting soggy, you can remove the root ball from the soil and cut away any mushy stems. Lay the root ball out on a screen to dry in the sunshine for a few days. Once the root ball is dry, you can repot it in fresh soil and water it thoroughly. Then, get onto a regular watering schedule as described above.

Soil Needs of a Peperomia Plant

The peperomia plant calls for indoor houseplant soil that does not hold water. So, consider adding bark, perlite, or small pebbles to the soil to ensure it is not getting too moist.

Soil Drainage Needs for a Peperomia Plant

The key to any plant like the peperomia is to ensure the soil is not holding moisture.

Resolving Soil Drainage Issues for a Peperomia Plant

If you do notice the soil is holding water, you can switch to a clay pot, which will allow water to leach out. You can also add pebbles to the bottom of the pot to ensure the soil never sits in water.

Lighting Needs of a Peperomia Plant

The peperomia requires bright, indirect sunlight, which will keep the leaves of your plant bright and vibrant.

Resolving Lighting Issues for a Peperomia Plant

It may take some time to get the position of your peperomia right, but don’t give up on it. If you notice the leaves are brown and crisping, you’re too close to the sun, so move it away or add a filter like blinds or a clear curtain. If you notice the leaves are getting mushy or the soil is getting soggy, you can move the plant closer to the light.

Pests or Diseases that Can Cause Issues with a Peperomia Plant

This lovely foliage is prone to the common plant pests you will find with most plants. Watch for mealybugs, scale, or whiteflies, and if you do see them, especially in the presence of soggy soil, dry your soil out as described above and spray the leaves and soil liberally with neem oil until the pests go away.

Fake Peperomia Plants May Be an Additional Consideration

Fake Peperomia Plants May Be an Additional Consideration

In the end, if you feel your peperomia plant is just too much to keep up with, you can always go with a fake one. The fake peperomia offers just as many energetic feng shui benefits and positive vibes as the real one.

The nice thing to add here is that a real peperomia plant looks just like a fake one with its thick, waxy leaves and strikingly vibrant colors. So, if you do decide to go fake, you’ll never even know the difference, except that you don’t have to water it or worry about sunlight.

If you’re worried a fake peperomia plant is not trendy, check out my article on whether artificial plants and flowers are tacky here.

Whichever direction you go, real or fake, you can’t go wrong with a peperomia plant. You’ll be so happy to have brought this bright, cheery plant into your home or office.

What’s happening with your peperomia plant? Have you been able to bring it back from the brink of death? What tips and tricks worked for you?

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