Why Is My Beefsteak Begonia Plant Dying? Tips for Rescuing Your Dying Begonia Erythrophylla Plant

The beefsteak begonia is a lovely surprise of a plant that has interesting-looking leaves and shockingly delicate-looking flowers. It offers different looks at different times of year and is quite easy to care for.

All it needs is a little love and attention. And this reality holds true even if you are worried your sweet foliage is dying. So, let’s keep this hardy plant alive and well.

A Beefsteak Begonia Plant Is a Great Choice for Your Home or Office

A Beefsteak Begonia Plant Is a Great Choice for Your Home or Office

With large, lily pad green leaves that have red undersides that can shine up through the tops of the leaves, the beefsteak begonia is a genuine delight to have in your home or office. It is a hybrid rhizome plant that has only been around for about 150 years since the first time this sweet bit of greenery was hybridized.

The roots will grow up through the soil, so they are entirely visible, and the big, platform leaves will show off all year round. Then, in springtime, these little sweet pea blossoms will sprout forth, shooting up from the soil and spraying outward like an umbrella of color.

It is quite the sight to behold. Add to this beauty the fact that this plant cleans the air in its surroundings and generates fresh oxygen, and you have a real treat on your hands.

Signs of a Dying Beefsteak Begonia Plant

The most obvious signs of a dying beefsteak begonia plant are as follows:

  • Mushy stems
  • Discolored leaves
  • Dropping leaves
  • Scorched leaves
  • Soggy soil
  • Flowers not blooming

Common Causes of a Dying Beefsteak Begonia Plant

The most common causes of a dying beefsteak begonia plant include:

  • Too much direct sunlight
  • Too much water
  • Not enough light
  • Not enough water

Watering Needs of a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

When you first plant the beefsteak begonia, you’ll want to water the soil plenty, so the water runs through the bottom of the pot and ensure the plant is getting what it needs. Then you can move to only watering the soil once it gets dry.

To read more about watering your plant, take a look at this article on watering mistakes that might be killing your plant.

Am I Underwatering My Beefsteak Begonia Plant?

You’ll notice you’re underwatering your plant when the soil starts to pack tight and the leaves get crispy and start dropping.

Restoring Water to Your Underwatered Beefsteak Begonia Plant

If you notice your plant has been underwatered, you’ll need to soak the soil, so it fills with water and water runs through the bottom of the pot. If the water doesn’t hold in the soil, you may need to pull the root ball from the soil and replant it in fresh indoor houseplant soil.

Am I Overwatering My Beefsteak Begonia Plant?

However, you may be overwatering your beefsteak begonia, which becomes obvious when the soil gets soggy, and your leaves get mushy.

Restoring Balance to Your Overwatered Beefsteak Begonia Plant

If this is the case, you’ll need to allow your soil to dry out thoroughly by placing it near a warm window with plenty of bright, indirect light and fresh air.

If the soil is developing mold or pests, or the roots are mushy, you’ll need to remove the root ball from the soil and lay it out to dry in the sun on a screen. Once the root ball is dry, you can replant it in fresh indoor plant soil and get onto a regular watering schedule.

Soil Needs of a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

The beefsteak begonia will thrive in a light, airy indoor houseplant soil that will not hold moisture.

Soil Drainage Needs for a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

If you notice your soil is holding water and not allowing it to dry out, you may need to break it up with bark and perlite, so the water will run through with ease.

Resolving Soil Drainage Issues for a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

If your soil still seems to be sitting in water, you can place pebbles in the bottom of the pot, so the water will run through better.

Lighting Needs of a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

Like a tomato plant, the beefsteak begonia can handle bright, direct sunlight for a few hours and several hours of indirect light.

Resolving Lighting Issues for a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

You may need to move your plant around a few times before you get it right. Aim for plenty of bright light in the early morning hours and indirect light later in the day.

Pests or Diseases that Can Cause Issues with a Beefsteak Begonia Plant

You are likely to get pests in your plant at some point or another. The most common are aphids, slugs, and snails.

To rid your plant of these pests, you can spray neem oil for slugs or snails or a mixture of water, dish soap, and rubbing alcohol for aphids. Spray regularly and remove the pests with a cloth until they stop returning.

Fake Beefsteak Begonia Plants May Be an Additional Consideration

Fake Beefsteak Begonia Plants May Be an Additional Consideration

In the end, you may find the beefsteak begonia is just too much work, but in this event, don’t give up hope. Instead, consider a fake plant, which can look just as real, if not even more real, than a live plant. You’ll even still get great mental health and feng shui benefits from this interesting plant.

If you’re worried a fake mother of pearl plant is not trendy, check out my article on whether artificial plants and flowers are tacky.

Whichever way you go, fake or real, you won’t be sorry to have a beefsteak begonia in your home or office. It offers far too many benefits and very little trouble. So go for it!

What’s happening with your beefsteak begonia plant? Have you been able to bring it back from the brink of death? What tips and tricks worked for you?

Leave a Comment