Can You Create Compost Living in an Apartment or Condo?

It’s really simple to compost, even if you live in an apartment or condo and only have access to a limited amount of space. Composting is especially great for people who have indoor or outdoor live plants because you can use your compost as fertilizer.

You might be wondering: what are the benefits of composting, and how is it possible for me to start composting when I live in such a tight space? Well, the benefits of composting are manifold, but here are the most important ones as they relate to your plants.

Composting is beneficial to plants because it provides them with crucial nutrients; plus, your plants will begin to grow greener and faster! However, what’s tricky is the fact that composting requires a lot of space.

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So, how do you compost when you don’t have a lot of space? We admit, it can be complicated to compost inside, but it can be done.

Can You Compost in an Apartment or Condo?

Can You Compost in an Apartment or Condo

Yes. It might seem like the odds are against you, but in fact, you can compost in small spaces. There are multiple different methods that will allow you to compost in an apartment or a condo.

For example, you might choose to compost with an electric composter or you might choose to compost with a compost tumbler. Whichever way you opt to compost, you’re going to have to research so that you have all the tools and knowledge to successfully compost in a small space.

Start with Some Compost Planning

Start with Some Compost Planning

The best way to begin composting in an apartment is to think about the kinds of items that you plan to compost. It’s also important to think about the kinds of things you want to use your compost for.

To start, consider the kinds of items you’ll be composting. Start a compost plan, a list of things that you want to compost. For example, you can plan to compost excess food—or even something a little crazy, like pet waste.

Then make a list of the places you want to use your compost. This gives you an idea of how much compost you’ll be using.

Consider the Size of Outdoor Composter That Is Right for Your Small Space

Consider the Size of Outdoor Composter That Is Right for Your Small Space

A composter will most likely go on your deck, or in some sort of outdoor area. But don’t fret if your apartment or condo does not provide you with access to an outdoor space because you can always use a tabletop, indoor composting system.

It’s important that you consider the best location for your composter. You want it to be convenient to use but not constantly in your way. Check your apartment complex or homeowners’ association regulations to see if there are any restrictions on composting. Some places don’t allow composters on a deck or patio, so make sure you’re following all the rules to avoid any trouble.

If You Can’t Compost Outdoors, There Are Indoor Composters

If You Can’t Compost Outdoors, There Are Indoor Composters

Although indoor composters might not be able to hold as much as an outdoor composter, an indoor composter can still provide you with state-of-the-art compost.

If you opt for an electric food composter, then you would purchase a plug-in kitchen appliance, that is around the size of a slow cooker. These appliances, which are also known as food recyclers, hold food scraps and automatically grind them into a dry substance, that can be added to plants and soil, as fertilizer.

However, if you opt for a composter that does not require electricity, then you would purchase a generic composting bin. This bin won’t automatically grind your food scraps for you. Instead, you will have to wait weeks or months for the food scraps to turn into a soil-like compost on its own.

Start Saving Scraps to Compost

Start Saving Scraps to Compost

One of the most important things about composting is collecting the scraps you’ll use to compost. So, here’s a run-down of the kinds of scraps that can be composted effectively, according to the Environmental Protection Agency:

Composting requires three things: browns, greens, and water. Obviously, the water part is self-explanatory. Browns include any kind of waste that is akin to branches, twigs, or dead leaves. Green material comes in the form of any kind of scrap that is food waste related, like coffee grounds or vegetable remains.

Here’s a non-exhaustive and specific list of things that you can compost: fruits and vegetables, eggshells, coffee grounds and filters, tea bags and nut shells.

Evaluating When You Can Use Your Compost

Evaluating When You Can Use Your Compost

It’s quite simple to figure out when your compost is ready to be used. Look for three things: a dark color, a crumbly texture, and a smell that resembles a wet forest.

Where Are the Best Places to Use Compost?

Where Are the Best Places to Use Compost

Once your compost is finished, add 1 inch of compost to your plants, and watch them grow.

When adding in your compost, don’t mix up your soils. Separate your potting soil from your compost to ensure that your plants grow. The compost needs to be on top of the potting soil, not mixed into it.

We’ve covered a lot of information about composting, and we hope you’re convinced that anyone can compost – even if you live in a small space. All you have to do is collect different kinds of waste and wait for your compost to reach its optimum state.

Once your compost is finished, add it to your plants, and you’re on your way to being a state-of-the-art gardener or houseplant owner.

Do you compost? Let us know if you have any tips for composting in a small space. We’d love to hear how you compost in your apartment or condo!

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